How will it respond to predicted climate change?

Kuakata Biodiversity
How will it respond to predicted climate change?
Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
KUAKATA, locally known as Sagar Kannya (daughter of the sea) is located in the southwest of Bangladesh. Next to Cox’s Bazar it is the second most famous sea beach of this country. And Kuakata is one of the rarest sea beaches of the world, which has a rare scenic beauty offering the full view of the rising and setting of crimson sun in the water of the Bay of Bengal. This 30 km long and 03 km wide beach has a typical natural setting and sandy as gently sloping into the Bay of Bengal.
It is 70 km away from Patuakhali district headquarters and

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Alien invasive species disrupting native biodiversity

Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
LANTANA is a native evergreen shrub to tropical America. It is now a major weed in many regions of the Palaeotropics where it invades natural and agricultural ecosystems. The plants can grow individually in clumps or as dense thickets, crowding out more desirable species. It may grow up to 6 ft high and may spread to 8 ft as a climber with the help of a support. Leaves and stems are rough, hairy and secrete an unpleasant odour like cat pee when crushed. In the tropics lantana is a non-stop

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Climate change: Disappeared South Talpatti, what next?

Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
The South Talpatti measuring 81 square miles in the Sunderbans has disappeared due to sea level rise and soil erosion. Its disappearance was confirmed by satellite image and sea patrols. Sugata Hazra, a professor from the School of Oceanographic Studies at Jadavpur University in Calcutta, told reporters, “There’s no trace of the island any more,” He noted

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Offshore Nijhum island: Overcoming climate change impact

Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
NIJHUM is an offshore island in the Bay of Bengal, located in the extreme south of Hatia island separated by Hatia channel. It is a scenic treasure trove having 20 kms long sandy and grassy beach. Accredited on the estuarine Meghna river and the Bay of Bengal, Nijhum is a virgin island constituted of intertidal mudflats and sandflats. The island is dissected by small creeks or canals and its centre part is under cultivation and human habitation. It is a cluster of several small accreditation mainly Char Osman, Char Kamla, Char Muri and Ballar Char.
It came under human settlement

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Climate change: Whispering from the Sunderbans

Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
Due to increased rate of emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone and chlorofluorocarbons) from different sources such as burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and other human activities, the rate of global temperature increase accelerated from +0.6°C over the past century to an equivalent rate of +1.0°C per century in the past two decades (Natural Resource Defence Council, USA 2006). Sea-level rise as a consequence of global warming is caused by increase in seawater temperatures resulting in thermal expansion of water and melting of glacier and polar iceberg (Kennedy et. al. 2002). The climate

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European hemeroby approach for appropriate measuring

Human Impacts on Nature
European hemeroby approach for appropriate measuring
Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
Nature conservation anchors a discourse that articulates a nexus of nature-culture-artificiality-stability-biodiversity. The concepts of human disturbances have been enjoying increasing popularity in the discussion of biodiversity conservation. Anthropogenic behaviour that harms nature” or “human activities contrary to nature” leads to unnatural conditions. The notions of pure naturalness are totally dogmatic and the present environmental conditions are the products of a plethora of human disturbances. Human

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Impact of climate change on St. Martin’s Island

Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
Global climate change poses a high risk to the biodiversity of coral reefs of St. Martin’s. The major threats to the coral reefs are high levels of sedimentation, cyclones, storm surges and beach erosion. Global warming is a matter of major concern for coral reefs of this island as elsewhere.
St. Martin is a tiny island in the Bay of Bengal approximately 9 km south of the Cox’s Bazar-Teknaf peninsula. It is the the southernmost part of Bangladesh and is locally known as Narikel Jinjira (Coconut Island). St. Martin’s Island is a stock of extraterrestrial, marine and land

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Parthenium weed poses danger to crops

Parthenium, a newly discovered invasive and dangerous weed, has been posing a serious health problems to human beings and livestock and also causing loss of crops and vegetation in the country, reports The New Nation
The dangerous weed is affecting many countries in Asia, Africa and the Pacific Islands causing serious environmental problems.
It is regarded as one of the worst weeds in Australia because of its invasiveness and economic and

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Sundarban water warming faster than global average

In the Sundarbans, surface water temperature has been rising at the rate of 0.5 degree Celsius per decade over the past three decades, eight times the rate of global warming, says a new study, reports Times of India on Tuesday. That makes the Sundarbans one of the worst climate change hotspots on the globe.
The study, carried out over 27 years from 1980 by scientists from India and the US, found a change of 1.5 degrees Celsius, a clear challenge to the survival of flora and fauna in the world’s largest

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Towards a new paradigm for conserving biodiversity

From The Daily Star
Morticulture
Towards a new paradigm for conserving biodiversity
Dr. Md. Mizanur Rahman
IT was not a poet but an American scientist, Mark Harmon, who nicknamed his field of study “morticulture”, to suggest the importance of managing the dead trees in the forest to maintain biodiversity. Deadwood plays a vital role for the functioning of forest ecosystems. Deadwood is an indicator that captures many elements of naturalness and is becoming a general reference for natural forests. Deadwood has become an important indicator to determine ‘hemeroby’ (the degree of naturalness) of forest ecosystems. It can be found as standing and downed dead trees. Standing deadwood is termed as snag and lying, as log.
“Some people think dead and

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Polluted rivers, risky water

Prof Mustafizur Rahman Tarafdar
The water of Buriganga, Balu, Sitalakhya and Turag are severely polluted. No biological survival can occur there as oxygen is depleted and might have reached nearly O level! Oxygen level in fresh river water is 9mg/l at 20ºc and 7.6mg/l at 30ºc (Summer).
BOD5 (consumption of oxygen for decomposition of microbs) indicates organic pollution. River Buriganga receives the following  types of sewage.
Nature of Sewage BOD5, mg/l
Strong Sewage 450-550
Average Sewage 350-400

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Climate change impact: Unplanned shrimp cultivation threatens environment

In view of the economic recession, particularly in the USA and European countries, the prices of frozen food in the international markets has fallen up to 40 to 45 percent posing a threat to the industry in Bangladesh.
“A red alert hovers over the frozen foods industry,” said Sheikh Abdul Baki, Vice President of Bangladesh Frozen Foods Exporters’ Association (BFFEA).
He referred that export earning from frozen food recorded a fall by

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Human Rights Violated by Climate Change

The UN Human Rights Council has adopted a resolution proposed by the Maldives to hold a panel discussion on the relationship between human rights and climate change.
The resolution states that “Global warming violates human rights of millions of people, especially in countries vulnerable to climate change such as the low-lying island state of the Maldives.”
“Climate change is one of the most serious challenges mankind has ever faced and has serious implications for the realization of human

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Mystery of the British penguins that are marching towards oblivion

From The Times
Lewis Smith, Environment Reporter
An endangered species of penguin is mysteriously disappearing from a remote British island in the South Atlantic at a rate of 100 birds every day. About two million northern rockhopper penguins have vanished from Tristan da Cunha and Gough Island, part of the British overseas territory of St Helena, in half a century.
The once huge penguin populations on the islands have dwindled so dramatically that

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Climate change and food security

Mahbuba Nasreen
World Food and Agricultural Organization’s (FAO’s) recent projections to 2030 suggest that globally the share of food in average household expenditure will continue to decline. However, recent trends, at least for some commodities, appear to be showing the reverse, with food prices increasing faster than incomes. Growing scarcities of water, land and fuel are likely to put increasing pressure on food prices, even without climate change. Additional pressures on these resources due to climate change, the introduction of mitigation practices that have the potential to create land use competition, and the attribution of market

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Reduce greenhouse gas emissions

Global Warming
Reduce greenhouse gas emissions
Farhad Tuhin.
Greenhouse gases naturally blanket the Earth and keep it about 33 degrees Celsius warmer than it would be without these gases in the atmosphere. Over the past century, the Earth’s temperature has increased by about 0.5 degrees Celsius and scientists believe this is because of an increase in concentration of the main greenhouse gases namely carbon dioxide (76%), methane (13%), nitrous oxide (6%), and fluorocarbons (5%). People are now calling this climate change over the past century the beginning of ‘Global Warming’. Fears are that if people keep on producing such gases at increasing

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