Excavated 1.4M-year-old bones in northern Spain have the potential to alter human prehistory

News Desk : dhakamirror.com

Photo: caves in Atapuerca. Courtesy: Google maps – Paco Puche

The oldest human fossils ever discovered on the European continent are 1.4-million-year-old facial bones, which could change the course of human prehistory, according to the researchers involved in the historic discovery.

Speaking to Anadolu Agency, Aurora Martin, the archaeologist and general coordinator of the Museum of Human Evolution in Burgos, said: “We do not yet know to which first human species the fragments found belonged”.

The bones, found at the end of June at the caves of the Sierra de Atapuerca excavation site near Burgos, constitute “a breakthrough that will help rewrite the history of human evolution,” she added.

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Waterways disappear as rivers die

World River Day today

Rashad Ahamad

Inland waterways, once the prime mode of transportation in Bangladesh, have declined fast as many rivers, canals, and other water bodies have disappeared in riverine Bangladesh over the past decades.

Due to geographical location, inland waterways were the main mode of transportation in Bangladesh, a country part of the largest delta in the world, but that mode has changed due to erroneous policies in communication development, experts said.

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Climate loss and damage are clearly visible in southwest Bangladesh

Views

Ashish Barua, Sawkat Chowdhury

The Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) by Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shows that the sea level, over the last 120 years, has increased by 0.20 metres, and continues rising fast, caused by thermal expansion, glacier ice loss, ice sheet loss, etc. The sea level rise in Bangladesh estimated using gauge data shows varying in different parts of the coastal zone, while the coastal areas along the Sundarbans are highly vulnerable.

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Amazing Planet: Elephants can hear with their feet and understand different languages

Beatrice Christofaro

Elephants can pick up low frequency vibrations with their feet

Elephants are skilled communicators with memories that could give humans a run for their money. But culling and habitat loss is making it harder for them to pass on this expertise.

They’re known as gentle giants. Elephants, found across Africa and Asia, are the largest mammals on land. And their massive bodies — from their sensitive feet to their complicated brains — are perfectly attuned to these regions’ savannas and forests.

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Chattogram city produces 249 tonnes of plastic waste every day

Will generate 428 tonnes by 2052

News Desk : dhakamirror.com

Chattogram city produces 249 tonnes of plastic waste every single day — 56 percent of which remains uncollected and littered in the environment, according to a new study.

“Of the plastic waste, the most are sachets, single-use utensils, and personal care items, ” the study added.

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How can Dhaka solve its traffic problem?

Views

Debra Efroymson

Illustration: Oishik Jawad

If I had a dollar for every time I’ve heard that “traffic was particularly bad today,” I could have retired already.

Over the years, people have hazarded various suggestions as to the cause of the terrible Dhaka traffic and its potential solutions. Causes include: not enough roads for all the cars; poor traffic management or a lack of operational signals; lack of lanes; an insufficient number of buses, including school buses; too many rickshaws; and the “disorderly” movement of pedestrians. Each cause suggests its own solution: build more roads/flyovers/elevated expressways;

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Tigers in the Sundarbans survive hardship

News Desk : dhakamirror.com

Tigers in the Sundarbans are in imminent danger of being hungry due to the rising spotted deer poaching.

The big cats, well-known as the Royal Bengal Tiger in the southern mangrove forest of the country hunt spotted deer, monkey, and wild boar.

According to a review study by the Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation Department on the Bengal Tiger Conservation Activity project, spotted deer is the staple diet of the tiger.

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Celebrating 50 years of global environmental movement

Opinion
Saleemul Huq
The global environmental movement started in 1972, with the first global environment conference held in Stockholm, Sweden, hosted by then Swedish Prime Minister Olof Palme. Among the heads of governments who also attended was the then Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, who famously declared that environment and poverty were two major global issues that needed to be tackled together.
Since that watershed event, the United Nations set up the UN Environment Programme (UNEP), and different environmental treaties

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Non-stop river pollution threatens water security

World Environment Day
Non-stop river pollution threatens water security
Laws, rules, HC directives go in vain
Rashad Ahamad
No pragmatic step is yet to be taken to protect the four rivers surrounding Dhaka even after declaring them ecologically critical 13 years ago.
In September 2009, the Department of Environment declared the four rivers Ecologically Critical Areas under Section 5 of the Bangladesh Environment Conservation Act. There are total 13 ECAs in Bangladesh.
The government formulated the Ecologically Critical Areas (ECA) Management Rules 2016 for implementing the act, including

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Saving earth from disasters

Opinion
By Md Zillur Rahaman
TODAY is World Earth Day. The day is celebrated worldwide each year to show support for the protection of the environment. It was first observed in 1970 and is now held globally by the Earth Day Network.
The UN-sponsored conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from June 3 to June 14, 1992, is known as the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development or the Earth Summit. After the long-running Cold War, the main objective of the conference was for member states to work together for sustainable

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Women for women

Opinion
Faria Rashid
PATRIARCHAL societies like to deceive women into thinking that women cannot get along, work together and stand in support of one another. Given the patriarchal history of society, it has mostly worked to keep women in their places and apart from each other. This is why we hear so much about women against women,
but not that much about women supporting women. Today, on International Women’s Day, I will highlight some of the ways women can, and do, support other women

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No country for elephants

Mostafa Yousuf
As if it wasn’t hard enough for elephants to survive in this country, in a tragic development, it was discovered that they are not just dying by electrocution. Shooting down the animals straight up has become seemingly rampant to protect encroached forest lands.
In Cox’s Bazar, 18 elephants were shot down in the span of three years, from 2019 to 2021. The Daily Star found this grim picture after piecing together the three years’ data. During this time, nine elephants were

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Air pollution takes 3 years off life in Bangladesh

Impact on life expectancy in Bangladesh worse than in India, Pakistan, Bhutan
Mohammad Al-Masum Molla
Air pollution cuts the average life expectancy of a person in Bangladesh by almost three years, said a global report.
It is higher than in India, Pakistan, Bhutan, and Afghanistan. Nepal, with air pollution-linked life expectancy loss of 3.05 years, is the worst affected in this region, according to the report released yesterday by US-based organisations Health Effects Institute and Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.
The report, titled “State of Global Air-2020: How Does Air Pollution Affect Life Expectancy

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Which are the 10 largest airports in the world?

The scenario of the global air transportation sector has drastically changed over the last few decades that has been subject to many variables over the past decade. Air travel is not only the most sought after and popular means of travel for long-distance but has made a major contribution to the world economy. It may seem unusual to you that some airports in the world are so big that they have their own postcodes as well. In today’s world, airports are more than just a place to get on or off a plane because there are many amenities available in airports like hotels, restaurants, spas, and malls. Few of these airports ferry tens of millions of passengers every

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Women-only travel platform Wander Woman wins grant worth $22K

Wander Woman, a social venture dedicated to female travel enthusiasts from Bangladesh, has won a grant worth $22.5K at the UNLEASH Plus 2021 Program for “developing a revolutionary platform for female travellers in South Asia,” according to a press release.
UNLEASH Plus 2021 is the third iteration of a 6-months incubation program seeking to build the capacities of social entrepreneurs, intrapreneurs and activists by supporting them with the implementation of solutions for the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

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Snakes help monitor Fukushima Fallout

Researchers have equipped snakes with tracking devices and dosimeters to measure the radiation levels in the vicinity of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan, in which there were three core meltdowns in March 2011 – one of the largest anthropogenic releases of radioactive contamination in history.
Radiation leaks forced tens of thousands of people to flee the area. Many have returned in the 10 years since but

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Celebrating World Samosa Day

September 5 is celebrated as World Samosa Day and the day is solely dedicated to the crunchy oily snack. Be it rains or winter or summer, samosas are our savour.
For those unaccustomed to the humble street food item, it’s a triangular-shaped pastry that comes with a range of fillings. Different parts of the world have their iteration of the snack – from samboosa to sambusek – while samosa is the version enjoyed in

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Rain at the summit of Greenland for the first time on record

Something extraordinary happened recently. On August 14, 2021, it rained at the highest point on the Greenland Ice Sheet for several hours — the first rainfall event in recorded history, and air temperatures remained above freezing for about nine hours.
The record-breaking rain is the latest in a string of warning signs about how climate change is affecting Greenland’s ice sheet.
Scientists confirmed these sightings on August 18th that rain were observed Saturday at Summit Station, a research facility that

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Emissions of CO2 driving rapid oceans ‘acid trip’

Emissions of CO2The world’s oceans are becoming acidic at an “unprecedented rate” and may be souring more rapidly than at any time in the past 300 million years.
In their strongest statement yet on this issue, scientists say acidification could increase by 170% by 2100.
They say that some 30% of ocean species are unlikely to survive in these conditions.
The researchers conclude that human emissions of CO2 are clearly to blame.
The study will be presented

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Warming trees limit warming – a little

Warming trees limit warming-a littleWarmer temperature prompts trees to release aerosols which in turn stimulate cloud formation. And that can help to cool the temperature, at least modestly.
Trees may provide the Earth with a little shade from global warming – indirectly. European and Canadian researchers report that they have found what engineers like to call a negative feedback loop above the forests of Europe and North America.
It works like this. Trees – those natural chemical factories that routinely deliver complex aromatic compounds such as

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